20 July 2011

Henry Moore Hoglands

I went to see Henry Moore's house 'Hoglands' located in Perry Green, Hertfordshire. Moore and his wife, Irina moved to Perry Green in 1940 and stayed till her death in 1989. After the house had been closed for 15 years, The Henry Moore Foundation purchased and restored Hoglands to open to the public.


The inside of the house is full of found objects mixed with Moore's own work, and also other respectable artists such as Degas and Picasso. Irina's cactus collection is in the greenhouse at the back of the house, where the garden is open and several of Moore's large works can be seen. I took a lot of pics in the garden and it's impossible to attach all, so I will post Moore's garden later. Watch out!

From the book, Hoglands




After the house, I went through the beautiful garden to the Moore's working space, Maquette Studio. They displayed Moore's inspiration of found objects such as stones, pebbles, animal skulls, small wooden statues, next to Moore's working progress. There are similarities between one of Moore's recognisable works 'Reclining Figure' and a funny shaped pebble. Moore possibly took the form of it and developed to a woman's body. A large elephant skull also caught my eye, animal skulls were one of Moore's favourite natural objects.

Maquette Studio in 1986

Moore working in the maquette studio in 1970

Moore's large scale of plaster statues were worked on in the Plastic Studio which was built with transparent material and has plenty of natural light. The studio has been reconstructed smaller than its original size. Displayed is the working model of Draped Reclining Mother and Baby





Yellow Brick Studio was Purpose-built in 1958, also used for his larger works. It later became a display area for his working practices. I also saw Moore's tapestries at the Aisled Barn, and the exhibition, 'Henry Moore:Plasters' at the Sheep Field Barn Gallery. Most of the works have never been seen previously.

Left: Sketch for seated figures and heads 1930, Right: Tube Shelter 1940 
From Tate Collection

Besides Hoglands, Moore's work can be seen all over the world, and because his works are strongly connected to nature and adapt well to landscape, I was often tempted to touch Moore's work. Because they often have a round form and gentle feeling to it, for instance 'Reclining Figure' I love to hug.

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